The Cat In The Hat Comes Back Book Review

The cat in the hat comes back book review

The Cat in the Hat is a children's book written and illustrated by Theodor Geisel under the pen name Dr. Seuss and first published in The story centers on a tall anthropomorphic cat who wears a red and white-striped hat and a red bow tie. The Cat shows up at the house of Sally and her brother one rainy day when their mother is away.

Despite the repeated objections of the children's fish, the Cat shows the children a few of his tricks in an attempt to entertain them. In the process he and his companions, Thing One and Thing Two, wreck the house.

The Cat in the Hat Comes Back

The children and the fish become more and more alarmed until the Cat produces a machine that he uses to clean everything up and disappears just before the children's mother comes home. Geisel created the book in response to a debate in the United States about literacy in early childhood and the ineffectiveness of traditional primers such as those featuring Dick and Jane. Geisel was asked to write a more entertaining primer by William Spaulding, whom he had met during World War II and who was then director of the education division at Houghton Mifflin.

However, because Geisel was already under contract with Random House , the two publishers agreed to a deal: Houghton Mifflin published the education edition, which was sold to schools, and Random House published the trade edition, which was sold in bookstores. Geisel gave varying accounts of how he created The Cat in the Hat , but in the version he told most often he was so frustrated with the word list from which he could choose words to write his story that he decided to scan the list and create a story based on the first two rhyming words he found.

The words he found were cat and hat.

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The book was met with immediate critical and commercial success. Reviewers praised it as an exciting alternative to traditional primers. Three years after its debut, the book had already sold over a million copies, and in Publishers Weekly listed the book at number nine on its list of best-selling children's books of all time. The book's success led to the creation of Beginner Books , a publishing house centered on producing similar books for young children learning to read. In , Geisel said, "It is the book I'm proudest of because it had something to do with the death of the Dick and Jane primers.

The cat in the hat comes back book review

The story begins as a girl named Sally and her brother, who serves as the narrator of the book, sit alone in their house on a cold, rainy day, staring wistfully out the window. Then they hear a loud bump which is quickly followed by the arrival of the Cat in the Hat, a tall anthropomorphic cat in a red and white striped hat and a red bow tie.

The cat in the hat comes back book review

The Cat proposes to entertain the children with some tricks that he knows. The children's pet fish refuses, insisting that the Cat should leave. The Cat responds by balancing the fish on the tip of his umbrella. The game quickly becomes increasingly trickier, as the Cat balances himself on a ball and tries to balance lots of household items on his limbs until he falls on his head, dropping everything he was holding.

The fish admonishes him again, but the Cat in the Hat just proposes another game. The Cat brings in a big red box from outside, from which he releases two identical characters, or "Things" as he refers them to, with blue hair and red suits called Thing One and Thing Two.

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The Things cause more trouble, such as flying kites in the house, knocking pictures off the wall and picking up the children's mother's new polka-dotted dress. All this comes to an end when the fish spots the children's mother out the window. In response, Sally's brother catches the Things in a net, and the Cat, apparently ashamed, stores them back in the big red box.

He takes it out the front door as the fish and the children survey the mess he has made. But the Cat soon returns, riding a machine that picks everything up and cleans the house, delighting the fish and the children. The Cat then leaves just before their mother arrives, and the fish and the children are back where they started at the beginning of the story.

As she steps in, the mother asks the children what they did while she was out, but the children are hesitant and do not answer. The story ends with the question, "What would you do if your mother asked you?

Theodor Geisel, writing as Dr.

The Cat in the Hat Comes Back

In the classroom boys and girls are confronted with books that have insipid illustrations depicting the slicked-up lives of other children All feature abnormally courteous, unnaturally clean boys and girls In bookstores anyone can buy brighter, livelier books featuring strange and wonderful animals and children who behave naturally, i.

Given incentive from school boards, publishers could do as well with primers.

The cat in the hat comes back book review

After detailing many issues contributing to the dilemma connected with student reading levels, Hersey asked toward the end of the article:. Why should [school primers] not have pictures that widen rather than narrow the associative richness the children give to the words they illustrate—drawings like those of the wonderfully imaginative geniuses among children's illustrators, Tenniel , Howard Pyle , "Dr. Seuss", Walt Disney? This article caught the attention of William Spaulding, who had met Geisel during the war and who was then the director of Houghton Mifflin's education division.

At the back of Why Johnny Can't Read , Flesch had included 72 lists of words that young children should be able to read, and Spaulding provided Geisel with a similar list. Geisel gave varying accounts of how he conceived of The Cat in the Hat.

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According to the story Geisel told most often, he was so frustrated with the word list that William Spaulding had given him that he finally decided to scan the list and create a story out of the first two words he found that rhymed. You can't use the word peaks. You can't use Everest. You can't use You can't use degrees. You can't So Geisel returned to the work but could then think only of words that started with the letter "q", which did not appear in any word on the list.

The cat in the hat comes back book review

He then had a similar fascination with the letter "z", which also did not appear in any word on the list. When he did finally finish the book and showed it to his nephew, Norval had already graduated from the first grade and was learning calculus. Philip Nel notes, in his dissection of the article, that Norval was Geisel's invention.

Geisel's niece, Peggy Owens, did have a son, but he was only a one-year-old when the article was published. In "How Orlo Got His Book", he described Orlo, a fictional, archetypal young child who was turned off of reading by the poor selection of simple reading material.

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In fact, like Geisel wrote in "My Hassle with the First Grade Language", the letters "q" and "z" did not appear on the list at all. He then tried to write a story about a bird, without using the word bird as it did not appear on the list. He decided to call it a "wing thing" instead but struggled as he discovered that it "couldn't have legs or a beak or a tail.

Neither a left foot or a right foot. Geisel variously stated that the book took between nine and 18 months to create. As Robert L. Bernstein later said of that period, "The more I saw of him, the more he liked being in that room and creating all by himself.

Random House retained the rights to trade sales, which encompassed copies of the book sold at book stores, while Houghton Mifflin retained the education rights, which encompassed copies sold to schools. According to Judith and Neil Morgan, the book sold well immediately.

The trade edition initially sold an average of 12, copies a month, a figure which rose rapidly. But Bennett Cerf at Random House had asked for trade rights, and it just took off in the bookstores.

After three years in print, The Cat in the Hat had sold nearly one million copies. By then, the book had been translated into French, Chinese, Swedish, and Braille.

The book was published to immediate critical acclaim. Some reviewers praised the book as an exciting way to learn to read, particularly compared to the primers that it supplanted. Geisel for this amusing reader with its ridiculous and lively drawings, for their children are going to have the exciting experience of learning that they can read after all. Both Helen E. Walker of Library Journal and Emily Maxwell of The New Yorker felt that the book would appeal to older children as well as to its target audience of first- and second-graders.

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Mailloux wrote in The Horn Book Magazine , "This is a fine book for remedial purposes, but self-conscious children often refuse material if its seems meant for younger children.

Seuss books on the list. The book's fiftieth anniversary in prompted a reevaluation of the book from some critics.

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Yvonne Coppard, reviewing the fiftieth anniversary edition in Carousel magazine, wondered if the popularity of the Cat and his "delicious naughty behavior" will endure another fifty years. Coppard wrote, "The innocent ignorance of bygone days has given way to an all-embracing, almost paranoid awareness of child protection issues. And here we have the mysterious stranger who comes in, uninvited, while your mother is out.

The cat in the hat comes back book review

Philip Nel places the book's title character in the tradition of con artists in American art, including the title characters from Meredith Willson 's The Music Man and L. Frith , who worked as Geisel's editor, concurs, arguing that "The Cat in the Hat and Ted Geisel were inseparable and the same. I think there's no question about it.

This is someone who delighted in the chaos of life, who delighted in the seeming insanity of the world around him. The Cat calls it "fun that is funny", which MacDonald distinguishes from the ordinary, serious fun that parents subject their children to.

Geisel once called the fish "my version of Cotton Mather ", the Puritan moralist who advised the prosecutors during the Salem witch trials. Seuss portrays the fish as a kind of ever-nagging superego, the embodiment of utterly conventionalized morality. Anna Quindlen called the Cat "pure id" and marked the children, as mediators between the Cat and the fish, as the ego.

In her analysis of the fish, MacDonald asserts that it represents the voice of the children's absent mother.

The cat in the hat comes back book review

She points out that on the last page, while the children are hesitant to tell their mother about what happened in her absence, the fish gives a knowing look to the readers to assure them "that something did go on but that silence is the better part of valor in this case". It's revolutionary in that it goes as far as Kerensky and then stops. It doesn't go quite as far as Lenin.

Parents say

Seuss books. Like earlier books, The Cat in the Hat starts with "a child's feeling of discontent with his mundane circumstances" which is soon enhanced by make believe. Seuss book in which the fantasy characters, i.

Seuss famous. Without The Cat , Seuss would have remained a minor light in the history of children's literature. Seuss stories for which it serves as a cornerstone and a linchpin. Before writing it Geisel was better known for the 'Quick, Henry, the Flit!